CARP is looking to work with provincial governments to make waves of change!

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Manitoba and Saskatchewan are on the move and CARP is excited and looking forward to working with newly elected provincial governments on CARP’s priority issues. We are energized by the prospect of engaging with newly elected Manitoba’s premier designate, Brian Pallister and re-elected Premier of Saskatchewan, Brad Wall and we congratulate them on their respective victories.

“CARP will be exerting pressure on provinces to reach a consensus on pension reform.”

Specifically, CARP will be exerting pressure on provinces to reach a consensus on pension reform, by following the example set by the federal government who has committed to enhance the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) by working and consulting with the provinces. For many years, CARP has called for an enhancement of the CPP to help Canadians achieve better retirement income security by contributing into a large, national plan. CARP members look to federal and provincial government to reach agreement and develop an actionable plan to enhance the CPP in support of the interests of all ageing Canadians.

“CARP members look to federal and provincial government to reach agreement and develop an actionable plan to enhance the CPP.”

Another burning issue for CARP members is having access to necessary healthcare services and support within their communities. CARP members will look to provinces and federal government to renew focus on national healthcare and have called on health ministers to take the opportunity to transform the current healthcare system to center around the needs of Canadians. At the same time, there must be sustained funding and national standards to ensure sufficient community and home based care.

CARP looks to working with all levels of government to make sure Canadians are not just patients but are advocates in their care, with the expectation that the health care system they pay for addresses their priorities, not just those of the providers who have traditionally decided where money is spent.

“In 2011, approximately 750,000 Canadians were living with dementia, which means that millions more have acted as informal caregivers.”

In adding to the concerns of having access to needed healthcare services is the fact that the reach of dementia is widespread and will continue to grow. In 2011, approximately 750,000 Canadians were living with dementia, which means that millions more have acted as informal caregivers, balancing their caregiving responsibilities with those of everyday life. Within 20 years, the number of Canadians with dementia is expected to double to 1.4 million, these numbers are staggering and so are the myriad of associated costs.

There is no doubt that research is important in how we better treat and support those living with dementia, but there is still no cure, little conclusive evidence of the cause, and very few options for treating symptoms. Often, the families do not know how to care for their loved ones living with dementia, and how to manage their emotional distress, along with financial and time burdens of providing around the clock care.

Having direct experience with dementia as expressed by many CARP members writing in and sharing their stories, CARP is calling for a national response that is long overdue and looks to federal leadership to address this issue head on with a comprehensive national plan and resources needed for its success. CARP calls for a paradigm shift in dementia care so that patients and their families can better manage their needs and have access to resources to help them live well with dementia.

“CARP calls for a paradigm shift in dementia care so that patients and their families can better manage their needs.”

To do this, CARP looks to work with governments and provincial healthcare systems to help them better understand the world of dementia by putting forward patient stories and perspective in order to provide effective resources, financial means, and policies that will help Canadians manage the daily realities of living with dementia. This not only means better access to specialized services but may also require fundamental change in how care is delivered. Canadians need a comprehensive approach that addresses the unique challenges of dementia and invest in supporting those living with it.

There are many challenges before us all, and CARP is looking to work with the provinces to make sure that there is agreement and concrete understanding of how we are to proceed on these big priority issues.